Making Your Homestead Pay – Part 1

Mushrooms and a variety of squashes from our homestead.

Making Your Homestead Pay – Part 1

Homesteading can be more than just a way to feed yourself. You can both save and make money by homesteading. We’ve helped ourselves out by raising as much as we need and more. The surplus is used to barter, sometimes used to increase stock, and some are sold directly to buyers. Making your homestead pay is possible.

Types of stock and where to sell them?

Our recommendation is to hatch twice a year, raise extra chicks, turkey poults, and ducklings.  The following methods for selling the extra stock are effective marketplaces; craigslist, myneighbor.com, word of mouth, and every once and again, the auction barn. The auction is typically the last method because typically the return is lower than the other methods.

A good homesteader views that their livestock is a savings account. We call it cash on the hoof.

Sir Loin

We also got licensed to sell seeds, so we raise extra plants to be able to sell. In our state, it’s only $35 to get that license. Aside from selling sprouts, cuttings, and seeds, we also raise rabbits, goats, and occasionally with the goats’ milk, we bring up a calf to sell.

Because we raise dairy goats and chickens, we have milk and eggs frequently available from the farm gate. We also sometimes have yogurt and cheese, and maybe soap for sale. We also have it known in our community that we sometimes have fresh vegetables available at the farm. They just have to ask. Another thing that Jerreth said to tell you all to look into, is a stand at a local farmers market. If you don’t have enough extra to need a stand, you might see if a friend who has a stand might be willing to let you sell yours from their stand. Another thing that we do that is an excellent way to raise a little extra cash, is raise red worms. Fishermen love them. Gardeners that know enough to know, love them too.

I’ll post again next time with a few more things you can do to either save money or raise money with your homestead.

Until next time,
Emily

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1 thought on “Making Your Homestead Pay – Part 1”

  1. Pingback: Making Homesteading Pay part 2 | homesteadingedu

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