Survival Seed Vaults are a Waste of Money

survival seed vault, garden seed vault

Survival seed vaults remind me of the electric socks my mom picked up for me when I was a teen getting ready to go on a winter camping trip. The socks did indeed heat but they were very large, very bulky and each sock required TWO D size batteries to run. To have used them would not only have provoked unbounded derision from my friends but would also have required suspenders to hold them up. In the same way survival seed vaults, though commonly offered for sale to would be preppers, cannot be justified as a legitimate expense. Let’s think about this.

Here are some reasons not to purchase such a seed vault.

By purchasing your own seed, you can get a better selection.

Survival seed vaults are generally stocked with a generic selection of seeds. There are often better varieties available for the one who browses a few seed catalogs and picks for themselves. For example, tomatoes varieties can be better for salads, slicing, cooking or dehydration. Do you prefer an acid tomato,  a sweet tomato or something in between. A seed vault doesn’t let you chose.

Article: Find the Perfect Tomato for Your Garden

Other crops vary in much the same way. What are the odds that the generic is going to be your favorite? Additionally, many folk don’t live in “generic environments.” There are varieties better suited for local growing conditions such as temperature, humidity and soil. These package deals won’t help you in this area.

By purchasing your own seed, instead of a seed vault, you’ll save money.

If you’re new to gardening, you’re probably going to benefit by planting fewer things than what a survival seed vault normally includes. If you’re an experienced gardener, you’ll almost certainly want to plant other varieties than what a seed vault contains. Even a beginning seed saver would grow, reproduce and save at least some of their own seed, saving even more.

There are important crops which cannot be held in a seed vault.

Jerusalem artichoke, sunchoke, sunroot
Jerusalem artichokes would be a good source of emergency food, but they must be stored in the ground and grown every season.

Article: The Neglected Jerusalem Artichoke

Article: Reasons to Grow Sweet Potatoes

Think about it, if one really wanted to produce food, wouldn’t root crops like potatoes, sweet potatoes or Jerusalem artichokes figure prominently in their plans? I know, if I had to grow my own food, I simply could not ignore these root crops. Yet I can’t store any of these in a vault until needed. One cannot keep these crops in a bottle and then pull them out in a crisis. But who wants to garden that way?!

It’s better to grow your own food now, than have a commercial seed vault in your closet.

In fact, the idea of holding a bunch of seeds in a vault until there is a crisis is actually a bad idea. Most people need to be practicing their gardening/seed saving skills now, before there’s a crisis. To wait for “the apocalypse” and then pull out a survival seed vault just “ain’t going to cut it.” There would be too much to do and learn in too little time, to succeed. Besides, what are the odds that a crisis will arrive… just before planting season?! Remember, also…

You’re more likely to lose your job than go through the zombie apocalypse.

It’s better to build a life style which prepares for the vicissitudes of life, unexpected expenses, job loss or a down turn in the economy. Learn to keep extra necessities stocked, in your pantry; and how to use and rotate them, as a life style. Garden, process and store food as a life style. You’ll eat better and be more resilient for it!

Great Book: Self-Reliance: Recession-Proof Your Pantry

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